International Forum of Teaching and Studies (IFOTS)
ISSN 1555-872X

International Forum of Teaching and Studies (IFOTS) provides an academic exchange forum for scholars, educators, and professionals to disseminate research on theory building and practice-based information on education. This peer-reviewed journal publishes biannually and particularly dedicates to the development and improvement of teaching within international contexts since 2004.

Library of Congress Web site

Current Issue Vol. 17 No 2, 2021

Author

Dr. Gabriele Strohschen completed her studies at Northern Illinois University in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. She works in Chicago's historically disenfranchised communities and joined DePaul University as director for the graduate programs at the School for New Learning in 2003. She retired from DePaul University and was honored with the title of professor emerita. Dr. Strohschen conducted action research, program design and evaluation, and teacher training in Germany, Czech Republic, Kenya, China, Mexico, Thailand, and around the USA. In Afghanistan, she completed a program evaluation project for the Afghan Ministry of Education’s Women Literacy Project, funded by UNESCO, with Dr. Elazier. Currently, she collaborates with community residents, organizations, institutions of higher education, students, artists, and activists in social justice projects, virtually around the world and locally at her Pilsen Storefront in Chicago and is spearheading the development of an advocacy institute for the education of adults among other adult education projects. Email: gstrohsc@depaul.edu

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Author

Dr. Michael Williams PhD., MBA, is the Dean of the School of Business and Management and Interim Dean of the John S. Watson School of Public Service at Thomas Edison State University in Trenton, New Jersey. His research, publishing, and presentation interests include the Psychodynamics of leadership, workplace bullying, and cultural change management. Dr. Williams earned a PhD in Educational Leadership and an MS. in Human Resource Management from Fordham University, an MS. in Labor and Employee Relations from Rutgers University, an MBA in Management from DeVry University, and a MA in Psychoanalysis from the Academy of Clinical and Applied Psychoanalysis, Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis.

Dr. Tami Moser PhD, DBH, is a Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Associate Professor of Pharmacy Administration at Southwestern Oklahoma State University in Weatherford, Oklahoma, USA. She is also the creator and coordinator of the Center of Excellence in Pharmacy Leadership, Innovation, and Quality Outcomes for the College of Pharmacy. In addition, she has served as a consultant in Higher Education and in the healthcare industry. Dr. Moser holds multiple graduate degrees, including a PhD in Organization and Management from Capella University, a Doctorate in Behavioral Health (DBH) from Arizona State University College of Health Solutions, and MPA from the University of Oklahoma.

Abstract

This article examines the influence of Psychodynamics on the online course room. The virtual discussion room is a cornerstone of the distance learning experience. Participants engage in virtual dialogue and discussion requiring their construction of learning environments that are academically stimulating and educationally rewarding within an academic community that is sensory-limited and geographically disparate. Thus, examining the key psychological and select theories and applications from the sociological and anthropological literature, may contribute to current research associated with the online discussion room and advance the efficacy of educators' instructional practice. This paper explores four (4) four areas that may influence the online discussion room; they are; 1) Psychodynamics: Origins and Organizing, 2) Psychodynamic Structures and Conditions, 3) Language, Symbols, and Social Construction, and 4) The Online Discussion Room: Internal Integration Considerations.

Keywords

online discussion room, psychodynamics, symbols, and social construction

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Author

Dr. Josephine M. S. Desouza is Associate Professor at Ball State University, where she teaches early childhood, elementary, and secondary science method courses. She holds a PhD in Curriculum and Instruction, University of Toledo; MEd in Secondary Science Education University of Madras, India; MA in English Literature, University of Mysore, India; BE, University of Mysore; and BS in Chemistry, University of Madras. Her research has focused on the quantitative analysis of teachers’ science teaching efficacy beliefs and qualitative studies on science learning behaviors of young children. She also serves on the Geography Educators Network of Indiana, Inc. (GENI).

Abstract

Understanding natural hazards such as an earthquake, the disaster it brings and the evaluation of a place for risks of the disaster from a cross-disciplinary perspective is important for secondary science preservice teachers, to engage in critical thinking, problem-solving and decision-making process. This paper provides an exemplar for developing a geospatial inquiry of the Nepal 2015 earthquake using the web-based application, ArcGIS Online. Preservice teachers experience its capability to map, access tools for spatial data analysis, and develop spatial thinking skills through visualization of the relationships and patterns derived from real world data as displayed in maps.

Keywords

Geographic Information System, Teacher Education, Geospatial Inquiry

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Author

Dr. Norma Nerstrom, EdD, is a retired adult educator who served for 20 years as the Manager of Career Training for the Continuing Education Department at Harper College in Illinois. In this position she was responsible for business, technical and healthcare programs. Her area of interest is transformative learning. She earned her Doctor of Education degree in Adult and Continuing Education from National Louis University in 2013.

Abstract

Transformative learning is described as an adult experience of revising beliefs and values previously surmised to be true, and at times this may occur years after a significant encounter. Adult educators may be a catalyst for such changes in their learners, even though they do not always witness the fruits of their labor. Based on the author’s research and her personal transformation during the study, this article highlights three stories of the long-term effect of transformative learning on adult educators. It discusses how their beliefs and values were originally constructed and later challenged through new experiences in their university programs. Ranging in age from 35 to 65 and representing diverse backgrounds, participants shared their stories through interviews, art, and writing. This essay also expands the research to include how adult educators, possibly unknowingly, may provide a pathway for learners in the healing of their grief stemming from childhood losses. Two stories of transformative learning are from the study participants; the other is the researcher’s story that had been kept secret for nearly 50 years.

Keywords

transformative learning, adult educator, childhood loss, grief, adult education

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Author

Dr. Rona Robinson-Hill, PhD, is an African American woman science educator in the Department of Biology at Ball State University. She the principal investigator of the BSU Training Future Scientist (TFS) Program. This program is responsible for producing the pedagogy for K-12 science method courses, which she teaches at BSU. Her work includes recruiting and supervising TFS Ambassadors that are undergraduates and high-school juniors and seniors to work in STEM research labs during the summer. She also coordinates STEM “Shadow-A-Scientist” research experiences for secondary education majors.

Abstract

Pre-service teachers (PSTs) often are non-science majors and struggle to understand science content. The focus of this pilot study was to identify the teaching and learning strategies to help these PSTs understand biology concepts. Results from quantitative surveys revealed four to five strategies the PSTs identified as most or as least beneficial. Research findings support the use of caring in action, teaching in the student’s zone of proximal development and sociocultural theory and beliefs. The implications from this study for science teacher education programs are critical if the goal is to produce future teachers that understand the science they teach.

Keywords

teaching and learning strategies, Science for non-majors, Biology for non-majors

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Author

Sascha Friedrich, BA, was born and raised in Germany and came to the US in 2008. He started studying Political Science at College of DuPage and graduated with a BA in Socio-Political Studies from DePaul University in 2018, focusing his studies on cross-border movement of people. He is currently completing a MS degree in Public Service Management at DePaul University in Chicago. He is employed at the Mozilla Foundation in Donor Care.

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic caused a global restriction on freedom of movement. Travel and public life have been affected and countries are still trying to find ethical solutions to protect the public from the virus without harsh restrictions on freedom and privacy, and without compulsive vaccination campaigns. As vaccination numbers are rising, ethical questions about restricting freedoms for the unvaccinated and granting freedoms for the vaccinated arise. This study examines these developing issues by applying the Markkula ethical decision-making model, and evaluates alternative decision options such as the Utilitarian, Rights, Justice, Common Good, and Virtue approaches. The results indicate that the only ethical option is a patchwork of regulations depending on local current pandemic status. Vaccination numbers can only be elevated ethically through persuasive outreach, information, and appeals to the protective conscience of communities.

Keywords

Covid-19, vaccinations, compulsive vaccination campaigns, ethical decision-making

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Author

Lamaiya Lancaster

Abstract

This article provides the evaluation of the 2016 Summer Dance Showcase Hawaii Graduate Internship, a community-based arts event, which played a vital role in community development, youth development, and the preservation and advancement of heritage, cultural vitality, and diversity. The showcase offered a performance opportunity to local professional artists, college students, and community members. All volunteers rated their experience as very rewarding or rewarding. The majority of patrons identified the aspect of the showcase they enjoyed the most as the variety of dance styles performed, followed by cost being free of charge, location, and then, event being for all ages.

Keywords

dance, community engagement, culture, diversity, performance arts

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Author

Fang Fan
Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China

Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic asked English Writing Centers (EWC) in Chinese universities to make effective decisions about how to implement routine lectures, appointments, and other activities on campuses. With the quick reaction and good facilities in Chinese universities, EWCs quickly adapted themselves to face challenges. This article examines the Zhejiang University EWC as an example to show the way it adapted to the new situation. Experiences for solutions to challenges in developing the flexibility of online lectures and workshops and the effectiveness of online tutoring are presented to highlight the potential collaboration with digital technology for future EWC.

Keywords

pandemic, English writing center, flexibility, effectiveness, collaboration

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